Tom Llamas, Age, Parents, Wife, Children, Net Worth, ABC, Salary

Tom Llamas the journalistTom Llamas the journalistTom Llamas the journalist

Tom Llamas Biography

Tom Llamas (Thomas Edward Llamas) is an award-winning journalist from the United States working as the ABC News Chief National Affairs Correspondent. He is Anchoring ABC News’ “World News Tonight” weekend editions and breaking news and live events with ABC News Live, and chief national affairs reporter, contributing to all ABC News services and networks.

Advertisements

How old is Tom Llamas? – Age

The weekend anchor for World News Tonight is 42 years old as of July 2, 2021. He was born in 1979 in Miami, Florida, United States.

Tom Llamas Parents

Speaking about his parents, he said that they are both Cuban immigrants who fled political repression, embarked on a potentially deadly journey along with many other young, scared refugees so that one day their children would see the success of Llamas.

Who did Tom Llamas marry? – Wife and Children

Tom is a married man, his wife Jennifer Llamas, who he married in June 2006 is a journalist working at MSNBC. The couple has two daughters Malena Llamas, born on March 14, 2013, Juliette Llamas, born on December 17, 2015, and a son Thomas Llamas, born on 13 October 2017.

Tom Llamas the journalist
Tom Llamas the journalist

What is Tom Llamas’s salary? – Net Worth

He earns an annual estimated salary of $87,153 per year. His net worth is not yet estimated.

Tom Llamas Political Affiliation

In 2016, During the Presidential Race, Llamas spent the year reporting republican candidates. He blamed Jeb Bush and Donald Trump for using the word anchor baby and dubbed Trump sleaze after asking him about the amount of money he had contributed to the charity.

Tom Llamas Career

Llamas has covered the most important stories in modern years. Recently, he helped direct the network’s COVID-19 coverage of hot spots across the country, published investigation reporting on the 2020 presidential race and ran the ABC News interactive touchscreen map on election nights.

He also secured key interviews with newsmakers including President Donald Trump during his White House campaign and an exclusive wide-ranging interview with First Lady Melania Trump. Llamas also interviewed Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky; Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro; and David Langford, the American father whose family was part of the Mormon church, who had been ambushed and killed in Mexico.

He has had the ability to talk to Pope Francis in both English and Spanish during the ABC News Special Pope Francis & the People. Llamas hosted the network’s special coverage on the death of Kobe Bryant, the grand jury ruling on the Breonna Taylor murder, and the rescue operation of the 12 Thai boys stuck in a cave. He was part of the “20/20” team that had been tracking the emergence of the Alt-Right and their fights with the Antifa protesters for six months. He has been honored with a variety of awards and distinctions throughout his career.

Llamas was an investigative reporter and the 5 p.m. anchor. Newscast at WNBC-NBC4 in New York City. He was also a contributor to NBC News and a contributor to NBC News for five years. He received Emmy’s Best Anchor and Best Hard News Story awards in 2013, and two area Edward R. Murrow awards in 2012 and 2013. In 2015, he was awarded the Presidential Award of Influence by the National Association of Hispanic Journalists for his reporting on the 2016 presidential election. In 2012, the Spanish-language newspaper El Diario awarded him with the coveted El Honor, the country’s oldest and biggest Spanish-speaking newspaper.

Llamas was the first TV journalist to join the Coast Guard after a crackdown on human smuggling at sea. Llamas previously served as a presidential campaign correspondent for MSNBC. He shot, wrote, edited, and posted on MSNBC Democratic candidates on a regular basis. He started his career in journalism in New York with the NBC News Specials Team in the 2000 presidential election and later moved to MSNBC. The Emmy Award-winning story documented how Cuban refugees are transported into the U.S. by speedboats.